MOM’S TRUSTEE

MOM’S TRUSTEE

By Tim Barkley. June 2019. The lawyer greeted Susan as she entered the office.  She waved a large maroon notebook.  “I think we might have found the trust.  Is that what this is?  It’s about a million pages long.  We were going through some boxes in the basement and found this last night.” The lawyer carried the notebook to the conference room and leafed through it while Susan seated herself.  “Yep, this is a trust form used by lots of...

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LOST TRUST

LOST TRUST

By Tim Barkley. May 2019. Susan sounded uncharacteristically jubilant on the phone: “Big news! Mary was picked up for a DUI and has disappeared! I don’t think she’ll be causing any more trouble.” “That’s a relief,” replied the lawyer. “We’ll have to talk to your mother’s lawyer and see what she says about the guardianship, now that Mary’s out of the picture.” “I think it’s more than just the DUI,”...

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WHAT DO I NEED?

WHAT DO I NEED?

What Do I need? February 2019. By Timothy S. Barkley, Sr. The handshakes concluded, the Johnsons sit across from the lawyer. “We need to get wills. We’re both in our seventies, and we’ve never had a will. And we think we might need a trust.” Mrs. Johnson interjects, “My cousin told me we should have a trust. She has one.” “Thank you,” responds their lawyer. “Tell me a little bit about yourselves. I see the two of you … kids?” “We have three,...

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LESS COMPLICATING

LESS COMPLICATING

Less Complicating. June 2018. By Timothy S. Barkley, Sr. First, the phone call. “Can you look over our wills and trusts?  It’s been a few years, and we want somebody to make sure they’re up-to-date. And we’re going on vacation and want to make sure everything is covered in case something happens.” Certainly. Let’s get together. Next week? The meeting. “We had this done about twenty years ago by a lawyer in Rockville. I read your articles, and I...

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THEIRS

THEIRS

Theirs.  March 2017 By Timothy S. Barkley, Sr. Pleasantries over, they addressed the issues at hand. “We’ve decided” she said, “half to his kids and half to mine. So, because he has 2 kids and I have 3, but one is both of ours, it should be 5/12 to Gavin, 25% to his son, and 1/6 to each of my two from my first marriage.” “That’s right,” he affirmed. “But my son is getting my 401(k), so that’s his 25%.” “Whoa!” interrupted the lawyer. “I’m just...

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